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Mercy instead of The Law

Neulandrebellen with Frauke voll der Gnade (german language article) explains the difference between the subject (of the crown) and a citzen: Where the subject has to plead for mercy by throwing themselves at the feet of their ruler, the citzen has rights, and the law, speaking to the state as an equal. The article then goes on to show how an important part of the neoliberal agenda in “pushing back the state” is also pushing back human rights, reducing having them to an act of mercy.

Starting point for the line of reasing was AfD’s Frauke Petry, who was trying to re-frame the german constitutionally grounded right for Asylum (and because it’s a right you can sue for it) into an act of mercy. But while this is a starting point, the article goes on to paint this as part of a larger picture, and a systematic agenta. “Less state” also – and always – means less rights, and hence more dependency on Mercy. For everybody, not just refugees.

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Trump Dump

A linkdump.

 

 

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Mandatory Widevine (Browser Video DRM) in Chrome

Changes are coming to Chrome. Not all of them are good.

For example the ability to actually view the details of a TLS certificate in Chrome has been moved far away into a hard to reach Developer menu.

Most Chrome plugins have been disabled and removed, and the chrome://plugins page will go away very soon (Chrome 57 and later). The remaining Plugins cannot any longer be disabled (Bug report). This will also silently re-enable disabled plugins.

One of them is the Widevine video DRM plugin, and that is widely seen as very problematic, for security and legal reasons.

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git Improvements for Monorepos

Microsoft has been doing things to git, they report.

[W]e […] have a handful of teams with repos of unusual size! For example, the Windows codebase has over 3.5 million files and is over 270 GB in size. The Git client was never designed to work with repos with that many files or that much content. You can see that in action when you run “git checkout” and it takes up to 3 hours, or even a simple “git status” takes almost 10 minutes to run. That’s assuming you can get past the “git clone”, which takes 12+ hours.

What Microsoft is doing here is called a Monorepo approach. It not insane, has many advantages and is being discussed at length at Dan Luu, and is also in use with Facebook and Google and in many other places. But git is running into problems handling very large Monoreports, as discussed in an article at Atlassian.

What Microsoft GVFS does, according to their paper, is addressing the issues git has instead of working around them. And that is an awesome thing.

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