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Fertig gelesen: Coaching, Beratung und Gehirn

Coaching, Beratung und Gehirn

The authors are Gerhard Roth (a biologist and neurologist) and Alica Ryba (a coach, student of Roth).

Roth describes the neurobiology as we know it today, and Ryba and he connect it to the various theories of psychotherapy that are relevant today in clinical practice and in coaching, discussing what can and can’t possibly work. For what can work, they establish the limits of change. Also, they try to differentiate clinical psychotherapy from (the psychotherapeutic parts of) coaching in method, foundation and goals.

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Sustainable development?

And while we are at it, here is what the olympic village, the stadiums and the rest of the Rio Olympics look like today.

EDIT: Someone pointed me at this article and podcast.

In 2013, all four regions associated with a Munich bid for the 2022 Winter Olympics voted against it; six months later, almost 70 percent of voters in Krakow voted against a bid for the same event; the Swiss canton of Graubünden voted down a 2022 bid in 2013 and two weeks ago voted even more vigorously against a 2026 bid; Hamburg narrowly voted down a bid for the 2024 Olympics in 2015; after Boston was awarded the opportunity to bid for the 2024 games by the USOC, residents of the city and state were so vehemently against the bid that the planned referendum never happened. Vienna has already very strongly voted against the possibility of hosting the 2028 games.

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Predicting the Jump to Electromobility

An article in The Guardian states:

Solar power and clean cars are ‘gamechangers’ consistently underestimated by big energy, says Imperial College and Carbon Tracker report. […]

Big energy companies are seriously underestimating the low-carbon transition by sticking to their “business as usual” scenarios which expect continued growth of fossil fuels, and could see their assets “stranded”, the study claims.

They are seeing a worldwide halt in growth in demand for oil and coal by 2020.

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The GRIM test and data in scientific papers

The GRIM test is very simple. The acronym stands for “granularity-related inconsistency of means (GRIM) test” – it evaluates whether reported averages can be made out of their reported sample sizes, and it works on integer data and small N.

Here is how this works:

Let’s make a pretend sample of twelve undergraduates, with ages as follows:

17,19,19,20,20,21,21,21,21,22,24,26

The average age is 20.92 (2dp), and we run the experiment on a Monday.

However, the youngest person in our sample is about to turn 18. At midnight, their age ticks over, […]

[W]e run the experiment again on Tuesday. Now our has the following age data:

18,19,19,20,20,21,21,21,21,22,24,26

The average age is 21 exactly.

Now, consider this: the sum of ages just changed by one unit, which is the smallest amount possible. It was 251 (which divided by 12 is 20.92), and with the birthday of the youngest member, became 252 (which divided by 12 is 21 exactly).

So if the mean cannot be the product of a division by 12, the data must be fake. The authors collected 260 phsychology papers and checked the reported stats to see if the results are even possible. Many are not.

 

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Being German, with a Hyphen

The BBC reports:

The Brexit debate in the UK is focusing on the rights of EU migrants in the country, among them about 300,000 Germans. Many people are worried about what will happen to them after Brexit. But how are the 100,000 Brits in Germany feeling?

and tells the story of Esme, a young british Expat living in Berlin (of course), applying for German Citizenship and getting it just now.

For Esme, and I suspect for a lot of the Brits who are now becoming German, what started out as a practical decision about visas and passports, is unexpectedly raising deeper questions about identity. Can you really be both German and British? And what does it mean to be German anyway?

Not so very long ago, saying to other Brits that you’re becoming German would almost inevitably lead to some tired gag about Nazis or towels on sun loungers. And although some British headlines might still use those cliches – and you can expect a few more if Brexit talks get nasty – today, modern Germany is seen more often as a bastion of tolerant values: international, democratic and open to immigrants.

Let’s keep it that way. In fact, let’s make or keep this a European thing.

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