Skip to content

Month: January 2018

Swap and Memory Pressure: How Developers think to how Operations people think

There is a very useful and interesting article by Chris Down: “In defence of swap: common misconceptions“. Chris explains what Swap is, and how it provides a backing store of anonymous pages as opposed to the actual code files, which provide backing store for file based pages.

I have no problem with the information and background knowledge he provides. This is correct and useful stuff, and I even learned a thing about what cgroups can do for me.

I do have a problem with some attitudes here. They are coming from a developers or desktop perspective, and they are not useful in a data center. At least not in mine. :-)

Chris writes:

3 Comments

Knock, Knock

What does your Mac do on Startup? Knockknock knows.

It’s not properly updated for current versions of MacOS, but it is still useful. “git clone https://github.com/synack/knockknock” and “/usr/bin/python knockknock.py” is sufficient to test.

TOTAL ITEMS FOUND: 44

That’s quite a bit. Apparently, I am starting

1 Comment

Conway’s Law

Melvin Conway is a compiler developer and systems designer, who is well known for the eponymous Conway’s Law. Various phrasings exist of that, and one popular is

Organizations which design systems are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations.

The original paper and an introductory paragraph can be found on his website. It’s worth reading, because there are more useful insights to be found in the original writeup.

So what does this even mean? Can you give examples from your current or previous work environments?

1 Comment