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Month: April 2017

Switzerland, post fixed book price agreements

Swiss NZZ has an article about the Buchpreisbindung, fixed book price agreements. These are still a thing in Germany, and have been in Switzerland, in the past.

In Switzerland, fixed book prices was not prolonged in May 2007. In the political followup, it came to  a public referendum in March 2012, and that did not come through, repealing the agreement permanently.

Since then, book prices fell by 20%, and variances in price mostly have been caused by the price of the swiss franc in relation to the Euro. 30% of the book shows also closed, but that is more likely caused by digitization of reading than by the price agreement going away.

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What happened to Google’s book scanning project

The Atlantic has a wonderful article about the Google book scanning project and what became of it.

In 2002, Google began mass scanning every book it could possibly their hands on, OCRing it and making it searchable. Authors and publishers soon began sueing Google from here to the south pole and back, but in the end realized that they did not actually want to win their lawsuits.

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jq

When dealing with Kubernetes, you will inevitably have to deal with config and data that is in JSON format.

jq is a cool tool to handle this, but while the man page is complete, it is also very dry. A nice tutorial can be found at The Programming Historian, which uses some real world use cases. My personal use case is Converting JSON to CSV, and the inverse of that. There also is a mildly interesting FAQ.

Learning jq takes about one quiet afternoon of time.

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Handling Mail, correctly.

Somebody sent me a mail with
Content-Type: multipart-mixed;
  boundary=X5O!P%@AP[4\PZX54(P^)7CC)7}$EICAR-STANDARD-ANTIVIRUS-TEST-FILE!$H+H*”
Thank you for that. This is precisely my kind of humor.
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Science March (vs. Placebo March)

Science March

»The numbers for the Science March seem high, but we won’t know until we compare it to the numbers at the placebo march that’s also happening.

I honestly feel bad for the people on the Placebo March, who thought they were at the Science March, but double blind testing is important.

I head the placebo marchers feel like they’re making a difference even after they’re told they’re at the placebo march.«

I am confused – it’s a science march, but in April. And the Placebo thing, that’s a concert, right?

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