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Month: March 2017

Back from Kubecon

Right on the heels of the Openshift Commons and co-located with them, Kubecon 2017 happened at the BCC in Berlin. Supposedly 1500 people attended, which was straining BCC’s capacity to the limit, especially on the A-level. Room A03, which hosted the “Deep Dive track” was continuously overcrowded and could not accommodate all interested people.

Also, this was the most noisy event I have been attending in a long time, especially in the vendor booth setup in B01/B02. On the other hand, the hallway track was exceptionally useful, especially if one escaped out the door, weather permitting, or upstairs.

Quite a bit of content was a duplicate from the Openshift Commons Gathering preceding the Kubecon, but the inclusion of rkt and containerd as CNCF projects have been news and are very welcome.

Especially rkt will be useful, as Docker is not doing very many useful things in the context of Kubernetes and rkt kind of restricts itself to doing only these useful things and not having any other, less useful (in the K8s context) code.

At the CoreOS booth I learned that rkt is right now not yet a drop-in replacement for Docker, but may well be soon – work is being done, and quickly.

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Back from Openshift Commons

So I have been to Berlin this week, for the Openshift Commons Gathering and Kubecon, and of course to meet a few Berliners.

Openshift is Redhats distribution of Google Kubernetes, plus their own enhancements. It is available on your own machines as Openshift Origin (the GPL version) or OCP (Open Container Project). Redhat also operates dedicated and public clouds based on this. The Openshift Commons Gathering is a meeting of the Openshift Users Community, Commons.

Commons was a nice and fine gathering in the basement level of the BCC, a single track event with a nice mix of users reporting back  their experience with Kubernetes and Openshift. In fact, Commons already had quite a bit of the content later duplicated in Kubecon, but in a smaller and less noisy setting.

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More Symantec News

Chris Byrne writes on Facebook:

If you purchased a Symantec certificate (or a cert from any of their associated subsidiaries and partners) through a third party, from at least as far back as early 2013 until recently; their third party certificate generation, management, and retrieval API allowed those certificates… including in some cases private keys generated by third parties… to be retrieved without proper authentication, or in some cases any authentication at all.

I think Google has been pretty kind to Symantec with their reaction. This is a complete CA meltdown.

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