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Category: Politik

Uber, Culture and Susan J. Fowler

A few weeks ago, Susan J. Fowler wrote about her very strange year at Uber. Basically, she experienced sexual harassment, HR covering up and a poisonous corporate culture. Apart from her personal experience, she characterises the culture like this:

In the background, there was a game-of-thrones political war raging within the ranks of upper management in the infrastructure engineering organization. It seemed like every manager was fighting their peers and attempting to undermine their direct supervisor so that they could have their direct supervisor’s job. No attempts were made by these managers to hide what they were doing: they boasted about it in meetings, told their direct reports about it, and the like.

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Sustainable development?

And while we are at it, here is what the olympic village, the stadiums and the rest of the Rio Olympics look like today.

EDIT: Someone pointed me at this article and podcast.

In 2013, all four regions associated with a Munich bid for the 2022 Winter Olympics voted against it; six months later, almost 70 percent of voters in Krakow voted against a bid for the same event; the Swiss canton of Graubünden voted down a 2022 bid in 2013 and two weeks ago voted even more vigorously against a 2026 bid; Hamburg narrowly voted down a bid for the 2024 Olympics in 2015; after Boston was awarded the opportunity to bid for the 2024 games by the USOC, residents of the city and state were so vehemently against the bid that the planned referendum never happened. Vienna has already very strongly voted against the possibility of hosting the 2028 games.

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Being German, with a Hyphen

The BBC reports:

The Brexit debate in the UK is focusing on the rights of EU migrants in the country, among them about 300,000 Germans. Many people are worried about what will happen to them after Brexit. But how are the 100,000 Brits in Germany feeling?

and tells the story of Esme, a young british Expat living in Berlin (of course), applying for German Citizenship and getting it just now.

For Esme, and I suspect for a lot of the Brits who are now becoming German, what started out as a practical decision about visas and passports, is unexpectedly raising deeper questions about identity. Can you really be both German and British? And what does it mean to be German anyway?

Not so very long ago, saying to other Brits that you’re becoming German would almost inevitably lead to some tired gag about Nazis or towels on sun loungers. And although some British headlines might still use those cliches – and you can expect a few more if Brexit talks get nasty – today, modern Germany is seen more often as a bastion of tolerant values: international, democratic and open to immigrants.

Let’s keep it that way. In fact, let’s make or keep this a European thing.

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Turns out, people don’t like traveling to Nazi America…

A report by Frommer’s states that

Experts across the travel industry are warning that masses of tourists are being scared away from visiting the United States, and the loss of tourism jobs could be devastating.

So far, the observed drop is about 7%, and is not limited to travel from Muslim countries:

Apparently, an attack on one group of tourists is regarded as an assault on all

the report continues. Affected are business travel as well as  leisure travel, and the projected losses for this year are in the billions of USD and in the thousands of jobs.

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USAgile Testing Days – canceled

USAgile Testing Days canceled

USAgile Testing days in Boston are canceled:

Sadly, we have to inform you that we decided to cancel the conference due to the current political situation in the USA. Our hearts are bleeding, but we believe it is the right thing to do. The Agile Testing Days (ATDs) stand for diversity, openness, respect and support the observance of human rights. We despise any sort of hostility or harassment.

The behavior of the current US Government Authority is unacceptable for us and against our values and views. As international organizers we also aim at a diverse and international conference crowd – audience and speakers alike. Many people of the community are expressing their concerns, and even speakers are withdrawing from their attendance now.

All of them feel unconfident about the next months and are unsure of potential problems when entering the country, including us as organizers.

I am waiting for their announcement of an alternate Venue in Cancun.

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