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Category: Politik

New Arrival: How to Kill a City

How to kill a city

Peter Moskowitz has written a book on “Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood”, titled “How to Kill a City”. It’s available on Kindle for some 11 Euro.

There is a matching article in The Atlantic, The Steady Destruction of America’s Cities. Based on observations in Detroit, San Francisco, New York and Post-Katrina New Orleans, he tries to explain the process of Gentrification and distinguish it from urban renewal or other forms of change that are frequent in cities.

While urban renewal, the suburbanization of cities, and other forms of capital creation are relatively easy to spot (a highway built through a neighborhood is a relatively obvious event), gentrification is more discreet, dispersed, and hands-off,” he writes. Moskowitz adds to the growing canon aimed at understanding and explaining the process of gentrification, and he not so subtly suggests that while gentrification  naturally brings some improvements to a city,including more people and money, it also frequently kills some cultural traditions and diversity, the precise characteristics that make cities so dynamic and desirable in the first place.

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Kamergotchi

Leider endet das Spiel morgen: In Kamergotchi muß der spielende Niederländer seinen Abgeordneten am Leben halten.

Kamergotchi, het ideale spel voor de betrokken kiezer. Hou je lijsttrekker zo lang mogelijk in leven door hem eten, aandacht of kennis te geven. Zoveel politieke invloed had je nog nooit!

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Dictator Chic vs. Trump Taste

In 2006, British author Peter York wrote a book, Dictator Chic, in which he identified all the design characteristics that autocrats’ homes have in common: gaudy gold-detailing, faux 18th-century French furniture, buildings of ludicrous scale and more. As York writes, President Donald Trump’s Manhattan penthouse would fit right in. Here’s a closer look at the aesthetic style of dictator’s past—the glass and the marble, the mirrors and the self-portraits—and how Trump’s own style compares.

Politico: Dictator Chic
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Alternative Facts, or better, Relative Truths

I know about danah boyd from her former blog, and from her book, “It’s complicated“. She’s on Twitter.

On Backchannel she’s writing about the internal mechanisms of Gamergate-type personalities, and how their own insecurities make them aggressive, a very interesting read.

My first breakthrough came when I started studying bullying—when I started reading studies about why punitive approaches to meanness and cruelty backfire. It’s so easy to hate those who are hateful, and so hard to be empathetic to where they’re coming from. This made me double down on an ethnographic mindset that requires that you step away from your assumptions and try to understand the perspective of people who think and act differently than you do. I’m realizing more and more how desperately this perspective is needed as I watch researchers and advocates, politicians and everyday people judge others from their vantage point without taking a moment to understand why a particular logic might unfold.

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