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Category: Media

Malvertising – we have only seen the beginning

Netzpolitik.org has an article (in German) in which they are interviewing IT-Security Consultant Thorsten Schröder on Adblockers, wasted capped mobile bandwidth and Malvertising.

netzpolitik.org: Neben dem Schutz vor Malware, welche weiteren Gründe für die Nutzung von Adblockern findest Du wichtig?

Thorsten Schröder: Wenn wir als Malware all das klassifizieren, was Nutzer ausspioniert, täuscht, kompromittiert oder finanziell schädigt, haben wir im Grunde schon mal eine ganze Reihe an Gründen abgehakt. Nutzer müssen die Möglichkeit haben, selbstbestimmt das Schutzniveau ihres Computers bestimmen zu dürfen. Hat die Bundesregierung vielleicht mal das Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik (BSI) gefragt? Es wäre eine gute Gelegenheit für das BSI, zu zeigen, was es drauf hat.

»netzpolitik.org: Besides the protection against malware, what other reasons for using Adblockers are important to you?

Thorsten Schröder: If we classify things as malware which spy on users, deceive them, compromise them or harm them financially, we have in principle covered all reasons. Users you have the right to determine the level of protection their computers need. Did our administration ask their Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik (BSI)? It would be a good opportunity for the BSI to show what they can do.«

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New Arrival: How to Kill a City

How to kill a city

Peter Moskowitz has written a book on “Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood”, titled “How to Kill a City”. It’s available on Kindle for some 11 Euro.

There is a matching article in The Atlantic, The Steady Destruction of America’s Cities. Based on observations in Detroit, San Francisco, New York and Post-Katrina New Orleans, he tries to explain the process of Gentrification and distinguish it from urban renewal or other forms of change that are frequent in cities.

While urban renewal, the suburbanization of cities, and other forms of capital creation are relatively easy to spot (a highway built through a neighborhood is a relatively obvious event), gentrification is more discreet, dispersed, and hands-off,” he writes. Moskowitz adds to the growing canon aimed at understanding and explaining the process of gentrification, and he not so subtly suggests that while gentrification  naturally brings some improvements to a city,including more people and money, it also frequently kills some cultural traditions and diversity, the precise characteristics that make cities so dynamic and desirable in the first place.

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Our coming Copyright Overlords

According to the New York Post (yes, I know), Apple’s Eddy Cue are looking to improve the original video strategy Apple has (most likely in reaction to Netflix and Youtube). The wording is worrying:

While at least one of the discussions between Apple and an executive was vague when it came to the tech company’s ultimate goal, the executive was left with the impression that the Cupertino, Calif., company is looking for a transformative acquisition and not just a deal to buy TV shows.

and later

“They talked to Sony and Paramount last week. They are preparing something big,” a source told The Post.

Nobody has anything concrete at the moment, though.

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Fertig gelesen: The Engineer Wizard

The Engineer Wizard

Paul Armstead is a fat, old man with no life. Helping a stranger in a snow storm, he gets a mystery box, which contains a Genie. Helping the Genie, he’s being transformed into a wizard, a being which can affect reality in an acausal way.

For the last 400 years, no new wizards have been created on earth, and the remaining 300 or so wizards and witches are ossified. Being an engineer, Armstead invents new ways to deploy magic and create magic effects, combining science and magic.

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