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Category: Computer Science

Moving from 1Password to Enpass

In order to move customers from a “purchase a license” to a subscription model, AgileBits is experimenting with dropping support for local vaults, requiring cloud storage of passwords.

There is a lot of blowback in Blogs and the 1Password support forums. Also, the security professionals on Twitter frown on this, quite a bit (Thread).

Discussion on Facebook pointed to Enpass, and that is actually looking like a pretty good 1Password clone.

Enpass on Mac, Main Screen
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Using MySQL Partitions (a Python example)

Today somebody had a problem with expiring a large table (a Serendipity Blog table).

In MySQL InnoDB, tables are physically ordered by primary key (InnoDB data is a B+ tree, a balanced tree where the data pages are the leaves of the tree). If you are expiring old data from such a log table, you are deleting from the left hand side of the tree, and since it is a balanced tree, that triggers a lot of rebalancing – hence it is very slow.

If you rename the old table and INSERT … SELECT the data you want to keep back into the original table, that can be faster. But if the data you want to keep is larger than memory, the indexing of the data will still be slow.

A nice way to handle log tables are partitions. Here is an example. It’s not very cleaned up, but it works on my system.

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New Technology vs Planned Obsolescence

based on an old Google plus article from 2015:

What you observe as Planned Obsolescence is often the natural outcome of fast product cycles that are necessary for any new technology.

When a new thing arrives in the market, it is often barely viable, a minimum viable product. We are remembering the iPhone 1 as revolutionary, but we chose to forget about is slowness, its clunkyness and the very limited feature set it had. And those of us having purchased a car with built-in satnav now have to deal with a car radio where you have to choose between listening to a CD or putting in the outdated CD-ROM with navigation data – and then wait for a minute until you get the route.

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The Data Center in the Age of Abundance

We are currently experiencing a fundamental transition in the data center. In recent discussions, it occured to me how little this is understood by people in the upper layers of the stack, and how the implications are not clear to them.

In the past, three fundamentally scarce resources limited the size of the systems we could build: IOPS, bandwidth and latency. All three of them are gone to a large extent, and the systems we are discussing now are fundamentally different from what we had in “The Past™”, with “The Past” being a thing five to ten years ago.

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Friday Deploys, and other harmful BOFH memes

Glorifying toil, glorifying organisational ossification

So somebody posted this on G+, and it’s a classic example for a thing that I classify as BOFH memes. That’s a group of memes and stories from operations people from a time past glorifying the toil and nastiness of operations.

This is going away now, for some time, and people identifying with BOFH thinking or finding it funny need to change, or go out of job. That’s also happening, rather quickly, and I have a talk about this (Slideshare, Youtube).

The direct answer to the image above is »If you are having problems deploying on a Friday, you will have them at any time of the week. Your processes are broken.«

People objected, confirming what I said.

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A modest solution to a simple problem: Filter on X-Trigger headers in Gmail

I have a very simple problem. My Gmail is receiving a mail with an X-Trigger header and I need to filter these messages (mark them as Archived, as Read an label them into the “filtered” category).

Here is a sample:

$ cat t
X-Trigger: test
Subject: a test
From: kris@koehntopp.de (Kristian Koehntopp)
To: kristian.koehntopp@booking.com

Testing
$ mutt -H t
...

Now, generating filters in Gmail is very easy for various capabilities, but for some reason filters on arbitray header lines are not possible.

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Google Next 2017, Amsterdam Edition

On June, 21 there was the “Google NEXT” conference, 2017 edition, in the Kromhouthal in Amsterdam. Google had a dedicated ferry running to ship people over to the IJ north side, delivering directly at the Kromhouthal.
 
The event was well booked, about 1400 people showing up (3500 invites sent). That is somewhat over the capacity of Kromhouthal, actually, and it showed in the execution in several places (Toilet, Catering, and room capacity during keynotes).
 
The keynotes were the expected self-celebration, but if you substract that, they were mostly useful content about the future of K8s, about Googles Big Data offerings and about ML applications and how they work together with Big Data.
 
For the two talk slots before the lunch, I attended K8s talks. After lunch, I switched to the Big Data track. I did not attend any ML stuff, and I missed the last talk about Spanner because I got sucked into a longer private conversation.
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